Feisty Trenton councilwoman has the right to speak her mind

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It’s a pretty good bet that I would not have much in common politically with Trenton Councilwoman Robin Vaughn. She espouses ideas that I disagree with and would not vote for her as my representative.

Vaughn recently got into hot water, yet again, for her fiery words at a City Council meeting with a member of the city administration.

She had the audacity to ask business administrator Adam Cruz, “Do you understand English?”

Of course he does, and he speaks two additional languages. Good for him. Because he is Hispanic, the question was considered offensive.

Governor and “Panderer in Chief” Phil Murphy spoke out critically of Councilwoman Vaughn’s words, saying xenophobia has no place in our discourse. He also has no place in an issue and incident that has nothing to do with him or his guilty white progressive psyche.

Councilwoman Vaughn shouldn’t be made to apologize or resign. Her future as a councilwoman in her district should be and IS between her and the voters in her district.

Her style and language may be coarse, but her passion and frank demeanor are almost a thing of the past in this politically correct, phony, homogenized false social and political environment.

Like I’ve said, I don’t agree with her politics but respect her passionate and aggressive style in getting the most for her constituents. Even as some of her outbursts in the past may have been offensive and in poor taste, she should have the right to express herself without the pearl-clutching reactions of the media and political phonies.

I wouldn’t vote for her, but I’d have a drink with her for sure.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy. Any opinions expressed are Dennis Malloy’s own.

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